NCCU’s 100 Black Men help feed homeless at Durham Rescue Mission

100 Black Men members, left to right, Will Stevenson, Allen Jackson II and Jefferey Adams give out deserts at the end of the serving line. (Staff photo by Homer Fennell, IV)

100 Black Men members, left to right, Will Stevenson, Allen Jackson II and Jefferey Adams give out deserts at the end of the serving line. (Staff photo by Homer Fennell, IV)


 

On a warm, breezy Wednesday afternoon the Durham Rescue Mission welcomed students from North Carolina Central University’s 100 Black Men organization who came to work serving residents in the Mission’s cafeteria.

When they arrived about 30 minutes before dinner at the Hope Center, the 12 young men from Central found a warm and inviting atmosphere.

fennell_rescue-exteriorAfter washing hands and putting on gloves, the men got to work cooking, preparing the tables and arranging silverware.

“We all worked together to get the job done,” said Leandro Valdez, a member of 100 Black Men. “The atmosphere of the event was great.”

Some of their tasks included separating old bread from new and putting out the fresh bread. Others made the banana pudding for dessert.

A scripture was shared before the meal. On this particular evening, it came from 1 Corinthians 10:31 “Whether ye eat, or drink, or whatsoever do, do all to the glory of God.”

During this special evening, even the volunteers got to eat with the residents and one of them played the piano while everyone dined and shared. The residents expressed their gratitude, shared memories of their youth, and expressed that they wish they had done what the volunteers were doing when they were in school.

“I really enjoyed myself. This was a really fun and interesting experience,” said Jaylyn Robinson of NCCU. “I just might come again next week to visit.”

After all of that it was clean up time and the dishes needed to be washed, but the feeling of laughter and fun that took over the room remained.

“Overall the experience was very rewarding and it taught me a valuable lesson. It taught me that giving back is important and that everyone has a purpose in the world,” said Allen Jackson II, a member of 100 Black Men.

The Durham Rescue Mission has been ministering to the homeless, poor, and addicted since 1974, when it was founded by CEO Ernie Mills. It is also Durham’s oldest and largest long-term homeless shelter, providing food, clothing, and much more to broken men, women and children in Durham, Chapel Hill and Raleigh.

The Collegiate 100 is an auxiliary organization that extends the National 100 Black Men’s mission on college and university campuses across America. At NCCU, the Collegiate 100 chapter is referred to as 100 Black Men. Male students who are in academic good standing and who have a passion to mentor and deliver community service are eligible to become members of a Collegiate 100 chapter. The National 100 Black Men sponsoring chapters work to nurture and enhance the growth and development of young African American males.

The motto of the organization is: What they’ll see is what they’ll be.

Reflecting on the event, member Harvey Landy said, “Whether they are the example or the learner, everyone is meant to affect someone’s life in a positive way.”

The Durham Rescue Mission welcomes questions, comments and anyone interested in learning more about the ministry working with the hungry, homeless, addicted and broken contact them on their website at www.durhamrescuemission.org/contact/

 

 

 

 

homer-fennell-tinymug
Homer Fennell of Raleigh is a journalism student at NCCU and a staff writer-photographer for the Durham VOICE.


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