Music moves our world


by Praycious Wilson-Gay
with Rosalia Preiss
Teen Co-Arts Editors
the Durham VOICE
thedurhamvoice@gmail.com

The Hillside High School marching band

The Hillside High School marching band

Music is a universal language for youth as well as adults. As my peers around me are always in classrooms humming or tapping on the tables, I come to wonder what their involvement in music is and how does it impact their life.

Praycious Wilson-Gay at SeeSaw Studio (self portrait)

Praycious Wilson-Gay at SeeSaw Studio (self portrait)

I discovered that from church choir, to chorus, to orchestra and band, youth are not only enjoying but participating and appreciating the art of music.

When I interviewed Ray DeBerry (a member of Hillside High School Band,) I asked him how it feels to have to go to band practice at 6 in the morning before school.

“At the end of the day, it definitely makes me feel more committed to

The Southern High School marching band.

The Southern High School marching band.

the band.” Jamario Johnson (a member of Southern High School Band) states that he “works harder” when being confronted by a more accomplished band.

Rosalia Preiss also interviewed a couple of people about music; she also incorporated her feelings on how music personally affects her.

“As a singer, music is a huge part of my life,” Rosalia said. “Some days, when I really don’t want to be at school, my chorus class is the only thing that gets me through the day. I sing whenever I’m stressing out, and it really calms me down.”

Maya Brown, a freshman at Jordan High School, and Nicole Shepherd, a freshman at Durham School of the

The Duke University String Symphony. (Photos by Praycious Wilson-Gay)

The Duke University School of Strings. (Photos by Praycious Wilson-Gay)

Arts, both agree that music is an important part of their lives. “Playing music sort of relaxes me, and when I listen to it, I am able to think of things other than the stresses in my life.” Maya told Rosalia.

Rosalia Preiss makes her own self-portrait.

Rosalia Preiss makes her own self-portrait.

Pianist and singer Nicole says, “When I’m mad, I play the piano and it takes away my anger. Listening to music also helps me concentrate on my work.”

Not only are there school-run programs but also “on your own time” programs that keep community youth involved with music. I was delighted to watch the Helping Hands Community Band perform this past weekend at the Phoenix Festival. As a member of Duke University School Of Strings, a Saturday program that develops musical skills of youth from 7 to 18, I can say that practicing is one of the essential components of strengthening your performance as a musician. This was evident at the Fall Concert when soloists Ariel Rigdon and Mariko Davidson brought the audience to a standing ovation this past Saturday.

The commitment, love and practice that these musicians show proves the art of music can move the world, literally.



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